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Submarine volcanic eruptions can result in changes in marine algal communities that can cover thousands of square kilometers. Satellite ocean color monitoring detects these changes as increases in chlorophyll and particulate backscattering yielding a potentially robust method for the detection of new volcanic events in remote locations.....



BPPs GSA with Joey Hulbert at the helm, has been tremendously innovative this year. The latest initiative, just launched, is the BPP BUDS (Bolstering Undergraduate Development and Success) program where undergrads are paired with grads for a one-on-one mentoring opportunity.......



Extraordinary things emerge from Len Coop’s office on the 4th floor of Cordley Hall. Len is Associate Director of the Integrated Plant Protection Center, with an academic home in BPP. IPPC’s services in climate and weather-based phenology modeling, under Len’s leadership, have evolved out of all recognition in the last few years and the flood of innovation continues thanks to a great deal of support and positive interaction with OSU faculty, consultants and others in Oregon and beyond.



Jeremiah Dung began December 31, as Plant Pathologist (Assistant Professor) at Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center with BPP as his academic home.



Joey Hulbert and Zhian Khamvar have a passion for science communication. They have created a talk show "Inspiration Dissemination" for KBVR, OSU's student-run, campus radio station. Grad student guests from across the campus discuss their research in a way that is easy for listeners to understand with the aim of inspiring others.....listen in Sundays at 7pm.



A common bacterial pathogen contaminating carrot seed in PNW production can now be detected in less than 24 hours compared to 7 - 14 days using traditional assays. The Johnson lab and collaborators have developed real-time PCR and LAMP assays that increase the efficiency and lower the cost of detecting this economically important pathogen in seed destined for national and international markets.



On a sunny autumn afternoon, traveling high up beyond the Applegate trail and deep into the forests of the Oregon dunes between the deflation plain and the coastal foothills, Oregon State University and University of Oregon students joined together on a trip of a lifetime, searching for what some avid enthusiasts believe is worth its weight in gold — mushrooms.



"Did you know that there are millions of DNA building blocks encoded in the genome of a plant? How can scientists possibly study this vast amount of data? With computers! Come and explore the tools of modern biology used to examine the complexities of DNA. This camp will involve hands-on activities where you will extract genetic material from a plant, assemble DNA sequences, identify genes using computers, examine your plant’s genome with visualization software, and test and look at your results in the laboratory. No programming skills required!" THAT'S HOW TO EXCITE 9TH AND 10TH GRADE STUDENTS FROM AROUND OREGON..........



In the August edition of The Plant Cell, the Dolja lab and collaborators have identified two previously uncharacterized transmembrane proteins.Their findings indicate that MyoB are membrane-anchored myosin receptors that define a distinct, plant-specific transport vesicle compartment. In an editorial overview in the October volume of Current Opinion in Virology, Dolja and Krupovic introduce a collection of articles that show that almost every single concept previously held dear by the students of viruses has been challenged or overturned by revolutionary new discoveries.



Luisa Santamaria, Assistant Professor at North Willamette Research & Extension Center and the Department of Botany and Plant Pathology at OSU, has developed the OSU Nursery Extension, Research and Education Program to implement bilingual education for nursery workers and owners in their own workplace.....



Molly Megraw's research involves functional regulatory circuits induced by transcriptome factors and small RNAs....



Major advances against some of the world’s most devastating plant diseases are starting to emerge from more than a decade of international scientific collaboration led by Brett Tyler, director of the Center for Genome Research and Biocomputing at Oregon State University. Tyler has fostered collaborative research in China, the United States and Europe on a group of organisms that cause diseases such as late blight in potatoes and soybean root rot. Both diseases cost millions of dollars in annual crop losses worldwide.......



Celebrate with our 2013 awardees! Bruce McCune is the OSU Alumni Association Distinguished Professor; Blaine Baker is the OSU Exemplary Employee...............



Fifteen undergraduate Botany majors,seven Master's students and one Doctoral student in Botany and Plant Pathology, one Professional Science Masters in Botany and Plant Pathology (Applied Systematics), and three Molecular and Cellular Biology students with major profs in BPP, will have graduated in the 2012-2013 Academic Year.........



Bruce McCune co-authors new publication with former PhD student, Heather Root, and daughter Myrica McCune....