James Mickley (he/him/his)

Herbarium Curator and Instructor
james.mickley [at] oregonstate.edu

Office: 541-737-5297

Research Way Laboratory Building

Research Way Laboratory Building 1176

Research Way Laboratory Building 4575 SW Research Way

Research Way Laboratory Building
4575 SW Research Way
Corvallis, OR 97333
Herbarium

Our priceless and irreplaceable collection of plants, fungi, lichens, and algae provides data to allow us to see where species were historically, how that has changed, and how species have evolved. Join us, and contribute to our knowledge of the plants around you.

Together with Oregon Flora, we are working on making the data and images of all 550,000 specimens in our collection available to the public, and building tools to allow people to explore the plants across Oregon.

Teaching & Mentoring

I am especially interested in building student appreciation for plants and in involving students in botanical research and our herbarium collection. I place a premium on effective, influential, and high quality mentoring to all who are interested in contributing, including those from underrepresented backgrounds. It is important to me that my mentees receive lasting benefits from our relationship.

My mentoring strengths lie in skills training, promoting student ideas, and building confidence. I strive to facilitate inspiration, confidence, pride, and understanding of the lessons of occasional failure. I prefer to work as a group, and to prioritize listening to everyone’s ideas so that all members feel their intellectual contribution is valued. 

Profile Field Tabs

At OSU
Affiliated with: 
Ag Botany / Plant Path
Courses Taught: 
Headquarters: 
OSU Main Campus
Beyond OSU
Biography

I grew up in rural southeastern Pennsylvania, spending a lot of time outdoors and learning about the plants growing around me. During my first year of college in Michigan, I asked my plant ecology professor if I could help out with her research and was floored when she agreed. With her, I helped run greenhouse experiments and conducted vegetation surveys.

After college, I went on to Stony Brook University and worked on invasion demography of Centaurea stoebe. I then moved to the University of Connecticut to study evolution and adaptation in floral petal number in the Polemoniaceae for my Ph.D. Prior to coming to OSU I was a postdoc studying the effects of forest fragmentation on caterpillar foodwebs.

My Publications