Jason Graff

Associate Professor - Senior Research
jrgraff [at] science.oregonstate.edu

Office: (541) 737-4090 x6204

Research Way Laboratory Building

Research Way Laboratory Building 1174

Research Way Laboratory Building 4575 SW Research Way

Research Way Laboratory Building
4575 SW Research Way
Corvallis, OR 97333

Phytoplankton ecology and physiology, bacteria-phytoplankton interactions, developing and improving methods for investigating marine phytoplankton from the cellular to global scale.

  • My research interests range from cellular to global scale processes related to phytoplankton ecology.  I employ innovative methods and state of the art imaging and instrumentation to investigate the interactions of phytoplankton with their environment and other organisms (e.g. cell-cell interactions between phytoplankton and bacteria including the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae). Recent work resulted in the first direct field measurements of phytoplankton carbon.  These measurements are being applied to evaluate bio-optical relationships with phytoplankton biomass, investigate phytoplankton photophysiology, and estimate trophic interactions and carbon cycle dynamics in the surface mixed layer of the marine environment.

Biography

I joined the Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, first as a postdoctoral researcher in 2011, then as an Assistant Professor (Senior Research) in 2015. Prior to joining BPP, I earned a B.S. (Advertising) from the University of Illinois and a B.S. (Oceanography) from the University of Washington. I received my Ph.D. from The Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island in 2010 and conducted postdoctoral research at URI before coming to OSU. My research ranges from cell-cell interactions to global scale processes that impact critical components of the marine carbon cycle. My current research focuses on linking phytoplankton stocks, physiology, and community dynamics to in-water and satellite remote sensing optical measurements in order to better estimate these properties on larger scales and to improve models of marine primary production and carbon export to the deep ocean.

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At OSU